In Your Wedding Bouquet-Toss, Don’t Toss Invasive Flowers!
wedding bouquet with invasive baby's breath flowers

Does it seem like you’re seeing a lot more weddings this year? The pandemic has couples getting more creative not just in ways to get together but also with their stylings.

I’m glad to see folks taking care to not spread a virus at these gatherings — but what are wedding planners doing to not spread invasive species? That’s right, an event fraught with superstition could also be fraught with invasive plants! Invasive species are not native to a particular area. They are also species that are capable of causing severe damage in areas outside their normal range. Learn more about invasive species here.

Engaged couples should make sure they’re not ordering invasive baby’s breath, bridal wreath, or other invasive plants in their bouquets. Pampasgrass and nonnative teasel are also popular in decor. Dried arrangements might mean seeds that are more likely to sprout. Thousands of flowers could turn into thousands of seed heads, which can crowd out native dune species such as wormwood, broomrape, and pitcher’s thistle

And you’d think a wildflower bouquet would be a safe bet, but stay alert—you could accidentally grab noxious weeds like teasel or pampas grass. What could be worse luck for a marriage than spreading invasive plant seeds?

So if you’re “Just Married,” whether you do a traditional bouquet-toss or send arrangements home with guests, please make sure the flowers are benign. And if you’re a wedding guest, speak up for throwing out invasive flowers in trash bags rather than tossed on the beach, behind the barn, or even back home in the compost. 

Steward

PlayCleanGo’s Official Spokescreature

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